How to Archive Folders in Linux (tar and gzip tutorial) - Linux Crash Course Series



In the Linux Crash Course series, we’ll go over one important foundational Linux topic each episode. This series includes tutorials, demonstrations, and more! In this episode, Jay will go over the basics of archiving folders on Linux systems. More specifically, examples of the tar and gzip commands are shown.

Thank you so much to Linode for sponsoring the Linux Crash Course series!
Check them out and spin up your very own Linux server in less than two minutes ➜ https://linode.com/learnlinuxtv

## Support LearnLinuxTV (commission earned):
– Get your own cloud server with Linode ➜ https://linode.com/learnlinuxtv
– Support me on Patreon and get early access to new content! ➜ https://learnlinux.link/patron
– Check out my latest book, Mastering Ubuntu Server 4th Edition ➜ http://ubuntuserverbook.com
– Check out Shells.com to spin up your very own Linux or Windows desktop in the cloud ➜ https://learnlinux.link/shells
– Affiliate store for Linux compatible hardware/accessories ➜ https://learnlinux.link/amazon
– Check out the Tiny Pilot KVM for your Homelab ➜ https://learnlinux.link/tinypilot

## Individual sections:
00:00 – Intro
01:01 – Spin up your very own Linux-based cloud server with Linode (sponsor)
02:22 – Creating a copy of the /etc (used in the examples)
04:38 – The tar command
05:17 – Basic usage of the tar command
08:36 – Viewing the contents of a tar file
10:53 – Viewing the contents of a tar file (in verbose mode)
13:41 – How to extract a tar file
15:46 – The gzip command
16:42 – Basic usage of the gzip command
18:10 – Uncompressing a gzip file with the gunzip command
20.04 – Combining tar and gzip to create a compressed archive
22:58 – Viewing the contents of a gzipped tar file
23:33 – Extracting a gzipped tar file

## Recommended evergreen videos:
– How to create a bootable flash drive for installing Linux ➜ https://linux.video/flash-usb
– Understanding Linux permissions ➜ https://linux.video/perms
– OpenSSH Guide ➜ https://linux.video/ssh
– LVM Deep-dive ➜ https://linux.video/lvm
– How to better secure OpenSSH ➜ https://linux.video/secure-ssh

## LearnLinuxTV Links:
– Main site ➜ https://www.learnlinux.tv
– Community ➜ https://community.learnlinux.tv

## About the host
– Personal blog ➜ https://www.jaylacroix.com
– Twitter ➜ https://learnlinux.link/twitter

## FAQ
– Which distro do I use? ➜ https://learnlinux.link/mydistro
– My recording gear (commissions earned) ➜ https://learnlinux.link/recording-stuff

Disclaimer: LearnLinuxTV provides technical content on YouTube that will hopefully be helpful to you and teach you something new. However, this content is provided without any warranty (expressed or implied). LearnLinuxTV is not responsible for any damages that may arise from any use of this content. The viewer is expected to follow best judgement and to make his/her/their best decisions while working with production or non-production systems and hardware.

#LinuxTutorial #LearnLinux #Linux

14 thoughts on “How to Archive Folders in Linux (tar and gzip tutorial) – Linux Crash Course Series”
  1. Gunzip is terribly inneficient. It only uses one core of the proccessor. I used to do backups this way and changed to "pigz" wich is the modern versión of gunzip for multiprocessors.

  2. I would consider myself an expert with compressed files in Windows, but a complete noob in Linux. I really needed this and it was awesome. Thank you so much.

  3. Why not use filesystem compression and never worry about compressing your files ever again? I admit I have to deal with zipped stuff, so it's good to know how to best deal with them. Otherwise ZFS and BTRFS cover all my storage, incl. compression.

  4. You never disappoint Jay. I must always have gedit open when I hit play on your videos, even if I already know about whatever it is, you always manage to ninja in something I didn't know.🤣

  5. Great stuff. I gotta get back to command line administration. GUI interface is handy, and easy; but there is so much more power and flexibility in the command line. What's next – CPIO?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.